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2017 Faculty Highlights: Awards and Accolades

Gunjan Agarwal, associate professor, biomedical engineering, was awarded a one-year grant from the Chronic Brain Injury Pilot Award Program, in the amount of $25,000 to study ultrastructural characterization of iron in Alzheimer's Disease.

Lakshmi Prasad Dasi, associate professor, biomedical engineering, was awarded a one-year grant by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Center for Accelerated Innovations at Cleveland Clinic (NCAI-CC),  in the amount of $150,000, for his research entitled “Hyaluronan Enhanced and Biomechanically Designed Trans-catheter Aortic Valve Prosthesis.”. He also recently joined the Board of Associate Editors of the Annals of Biomedical Engineering. Dasi received a NIH R01 grant titled; “Superhydrophobic Heart Value Prosthesis”. This four-year grant is for $3M and runs from August 1, 2017 to July 31, 2021. In addition, Dasi received the 2017 Melissa G. Piper Distinguished Mentor Award from the Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, College of Medicine.

Daniel Gallego-Perez, assistant professor, biomedical engineering and medicine, was awarded the 2017 Distinguished Faculty, College of Engineering, Lumley Interdisciplinary Research Award.

Samir Ghadiali, professor, biomedical engineering and director of BME graduate studies, has been elected to the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) College of Fellows – Class of 2018! The induction ceremony will take place at the AIMBE Annual Meeting on April 8 & 9, 2018 in Washington, D.C. 

Keith Gooch, professor, biomedical engineering , received a two-year grant from the American Heart Association for $154,000 to study the mechanical regulation of cardiac phenotype.  Gooch also received the 2017 Herman R. Weed Excellence in Teaching Award from the Department of Biomedical Engineering.

Thomas Hund, professor, biomedical engineering, in collaboration with Peter Mohler received 3.2 million from a National Institutes of Health (NIH), R01 grant entitled “Defining novel mechanisms for regulation of atrial INa and arrhythmias” effective for four years; and awarded another R01 grant in the amount of $1.6 million to investigate spectrin-based regulation of cardiac remodeling and heart failure. He also received the 2017 Distinguished Faculty, College of Engineering, Lumley Research Award. 

Xiaoming 'Shawn' He, professor, biomedical engineering, was awarded a $1.4 million NIH  grant to fund his work on a treatment for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and premature ovarian failure (POF).

Matthew Reilly, assistant professor, biomedical engineering, was awarded a one year grant from the Chronic Brain Injury: Pilot Award Program 2017 (CBI) in the amount of $25,000 to study retinal changes in traumatic optic neuropathy.

Cynthia Roberts, professor, biomedical engineering and Martha G. and Milton Staub Chair for Research in Ophthalmology, was awarded a five-year, $1.925M Research Project (R01) grant from NIH. The grant is entitled “Corneal Biomechanics in Ocular Disease,” and was effective starting March 1, 2017. 

Katelyn Swindle-Reilly, assistant professor, in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering received the Lois Hagelberger-Huebner Young Investigator Award from the Ohio Lions Eye Research Foundation. The proposal is titled “Sustained Release Bevacizumab Injectable for the Treatment of Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration." This award is for $107,000 per year for two years, September 15, 2017 to September 14, 2019. Swindle-Reilly and former colleagues at Rochal Industries, LLC, were were granted a U.S. patent. She also completed the REACH for Commercialization program at Ohio State.

Jessica Winter, professor, in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, was awarded the 2017 College of Engineering Dean’s Award for Distinguished Outreach Achievements.

Yi Zhao, associate professor, biomedical engineering, invented a smartphone-based, portable pathology slide scanner. Zhao also received a $225,000 National Science Foundation Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Phase I award. He was awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant entitled “Personal Whole Slide Imaging Device with Liquid Lenses”. The $200,000 award runs from July 15, 2017 – December 31, 2018.