OSU BME Seminar Series: Dr. Felipe Quiroz, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University

All dates for this event occur in the past.

In-person 2000 Fontana Labs
https://osu.zoom.us/j/95911979546?pwd=MFM4MzNyajdCRzIwVE53NGR5RXhpZz09
Password: 381358
United States

Felipe G. Quiroz, PhD

Assistant Professor
Biomedical Engineering
Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University
 

Abstract:

"Programming and probing the self-assembly of intrinsically-disordered proteins"

Intrinsically-disordered proteins (IDPs) recently emerged as major drivers of self-assembly in nature. Mechanistically, their stimuli-responsive solubility in aqueous solutions is governed by liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) dynamics. Intracellularly, for example, phase-separated IDP-assemblies orchestrate wide-ranging cellular mechanisms, from genome organization to cell division. These bioinspired insights suggest that IDPs are outstanding building blocks for cellular engineering and for the design of self-assembling “smart” materials. In this talk, I will present our progress toward programming and probing the LLPS behaviors of intrinsically-disordered proteins (IDPs), demonstrating their utility as self-assembling nanomaterials and as scaffolds for engineered organelles. I will highlight our two main approaches: (1) the engineering of lower and upper critical solution temperature (LCST and UCST, respectively) LLPS behavior in IDP polymers (Nature Materials 2015, Science Advances 2019); and (2) the development of genetically encoded sensors to probe the material properties of intracellular IDP-assemblies (Science 2020, JID Innovations 2021). Dwelling in materials engineering, I will discuss how the syntax and architecture of IDP polymers control their ability to access complex (e.g., band pass, with dual LCST/UCST) and non-equilibrium LLPS behaviors. As an example, these advances enabled the engineering of IDPs that form nanorods with superb stability. Finally, I will discuss LLPS-inspired cellular engineering approaches for bioimaging applications. Overall, my goal is to demonstrate IDP self-assembly as major direction for future biomedical engineering innovation.

Bio:

Felipe G. Quiroz is Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University. Dr. Quiroz and his team mine protein self-assembly in engineered and biological material systems. He holds a Career Award at the Scientific Interface from Burroughs Wellcome Fund.